A $375K deal for a box of first edition Pokémon cards went sour after it was revealed that the contents of the box were actually fake. Worse still, the transaction (which would have amounted to £287,000 in the UK) was livestreamed on YouTube. Skip to 35 minutes into the clip to watch it all unfold.

Initially, everything’s off to a great start. That is until someone notices one of the packs is in fact not a first edition. To their horror, the sellers then discover that a number of packs are already open (that'd be enough to comprise the deal right away) before confirming that the box has been resealed. An atmosphere of elation is soon replaced by disappointment and heartbreak as they realize the forgery.

A group of three sellers made the decision to buy the box, and if all had gone to plan, should have contained 36 unopened booster packs and 396 cards. The sellers included YouTube host Chris Camillo, known for his work on the channel “Dumb Money”, and a "blockchain entrepreneur”, Jake Greenbaum, known by his Twitter name JBTheCryptoKing.

“Ooh, the color's different on that one and that one,” someone can be heard saying. “That one’s not a first edition pack,” said someone else. “Yeah look, they’re open.”

“That’s an issue,” Jake Greenbaum puts in. “Yeah, no, that’s a major f**king issue.”

Greenbaum, once dubbed as Logan Paul’s “personal Pokémon consultant”, swiftly gets into contact with the original seller to claim a refund, calling it “absolutely unacceptable”.

The unnamed original seller had asked to be paid in cash. The silver briefcase on the table during the live-stream actually contained $100 bills. In the event the box had been checked and confirmed authentic, the money would have been handed over and the cards would have sold in aid of charity.